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Not Eating After 10:00

Monday, June 11, 2012

Eating late at night is my biggest downfall. If I could change that one habit, it would be a game changer for my weight and health. But as easy as it sounds on the surface, my resolve crumbles every night. This morning I set the same intention - no eating after 10:00 tonight, and my next thought was to doubt myself. I started trying to think of times when I have made it through late night without eating. The only good examples were when I had to do it for medical reasons (fasting blood tests, etc.). I tried to remember what my mental state was through those foodless nights. Interestingly, I don't recall any of the mental agony of foods in the refrigerator calling out to me the whole time, as happens when there's not a medical reason for fasting. My mind was relatively quiet, and accepting of the necessity. So obviously I was in some control of my thoughts, turning them off because I had to. But most nights my mind is not quietly accepting; it's a spoiled brat that wants what it wants, and wants it now, and throws tantrums until it's satisfied. This begs the question - if I can calmly accept the necessity of not eating after 10:00 for medical reasons, why can't I accept that necessity for my own health? Logic would say that my health is an even more compelling reason than medical tests. But clearly, logic does not reign in this domain. Compulsion and habitual thinking loops are my queen of the night. Ironically, if I don't change this, then I'll soon find myself subjected to the ultimate ongoing lab test, as I will almost certainly develop diabetes and will need to prick myself for blood tests constantly. Maybe that's a key to try - if I think of pricking my finger to test my blood each time the refrigerator calls out to me tonight, perhaps that looming medical necessity will help me to accept not eating. It's an experiment worth trying, at least. I hope that it will lead me closer to the quiet mind of acceptance that I need to change this habit. (Maybe that, and a cup of tea.)
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • no profile photo CD8022584
    I sleep better too if I have a small snack before bed. A half pnut butter sandwich does it for me.
    But in the past I have had the same problems you are having. But over time I have changed, it took time and resolve though.
    Glad to see you back online and sparking again.

    Phyllis emoticon
    3097 days ago
  • LAURALITE
    Thank you for your suggestions and encouragement! Coincidentally, I just saw a segment on this evening's news reporting research that shows people are most susceptible to unhealthy food temptations when overtired. I guess I'm living confirmation of that theory! I'm a night owl by nature, but I'm sure that if I could get myself to bed a bit earlier it would surely help.
    3099 days ago
  • MISSB8604
    You’re not alone in this struggle. When I was working late into the night and getting home at 11:30 or so, I’d EAT EAT EAT. I now have a rule that I cannot eat after 8pm unless my schedule is too crazy for me to eat on time. One thing I have learned is to not be hard on yourself when you do get off track. Try not eating a huge meal, but maybe some fruit or some veggies. Take it 1 day at a time and see where you end up. You can do this.
    3099 days ago
  • no profile photo CD12108131
    I started off with an 8 pm time, then went to 7:45, etc. 15 minutes a week. I actually have read numerous articles on here as well as other sources that it does not matter to your body what time you eat unless you have digestive problems or heartburns, but for metabolism it does not matter. I have found I do sleep better, so have continued not to eat after 8. I went back to 8 because I work a different schedule in summer. Best wishes on your ventures.
    3099 days ago
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