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This whiny baby needs Cheeriment

Thursday, May 19, 2016

I Really Really need some "Cheeriment" (The word you get when your 4 year old mixes up encouragement and cheering up).

I got really upset and discouraged and weepy yesterday after the nurse from the Dr's office called. The thing is I didn't expect much from my blood work because everything I read said that when you lose weight quickly it raises your cholesterol (all that fat being released into the bloodstream). So I expected everything to go up. But it didn't. My Cholesterol went down my LDL's (Bad) went down 23 points, great right? Except my HDL(good) which is already way too low, went down! You know how you raise HDL? Exercise, weight loss, better diet....

So frustrated!

Plus, my liver function test results were "elevated", which the nurse made sound like no big deal, just "we'll retest it next visit", but then this morning there is a brand new "condition" listed on my patient record, that condition basically meaning the precursor to clogged arteries and bypass surgeries.

I feel like all my hard work is for nothing, it seems so frustrating and pointless.
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Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • -JAMES-
    I don't know where you read that loosing weight, quickly or otherwise, would impact your cholesterol.

    As NAYPOOIE wrote, if your weight loss program is a low carb plan, then chances are your cholesterol gets better. I wonder if perhaps your cholesterol was worse, and as you loose weight it keeps getting better, and the test was done in the middle of your weight loss. In other words you are actually getting healthier.

    Elevated liver enzymes can be from fatty liver. So again perhaps as you loose body fat this too is actually getting better.

    In any case, unless your doctor told you specifically to stop loosing body fat, then I'd stay on the path you are on. It has to be healthier to be leaner, period. All your hard work is not pointless. It is the way to better health.
    1622 days ago
  • IMUSTLOSEIT1
    emoticon hope those numbers goes the right way.
    1622 days ago
  • MWOJICK
    I also have elevated liver enzymes. My Doctor said not to worry and that they would probably level off once I lost more weight, but that if they didn't we should look into other tests and possibly a change of medications. So I guess just play the waiting game for a while, but don't let that distract you from feeling good about yourself- you have achieved a lot in a short amount of time! emoticon
    1622 days ago
  • MOMTOMONKEYS2
    http://www.drbriffa.com/2011/03/04/
    low-carbohydrate-diet-very-quic
    kly-effective-for-getting-fat-o
    ut-of-the-liver/

    I also found this " If obesity is suspected as the cause of fatty liver, weight reduction of 5% to 10% should also bring the liver enzyme levels to normal or near normal levels." http://www.medicinenet.com/liver_bl
    ood_tests/page3.htm

    1622 days ago
  • MOMTOMONKEYS2
    I know there are some good books about how low carb works in the body and what different studies have shown with blood work etc. Have your read The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living or Keto Clarity? I know there are other books too and I think the LC forum has a resources section if you wanted to look. I'm still learning myself and I'm no expert but I think a few things are possible...maybe the longer you are on this way of eating the better the results will be and maybe you just need to tweak what you are doing as far as your macronutrients or vitamins and minerals? I hope someone with more background answers you soon and can provide some helpful info. emoticon Hang in there and don't give up!
    1622 days ago
  • NAYPOOIE
    I see you're on my low carb team, but are you actually doing low carb? That usually raises the HDL.
    1622 days ago
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