SP Premium
WATERMELLEN
150,000-199,999 SparkPoints 161,057
SparkPoints
 

AVOID Frailty

Voted Popular Blog Post: View All Popular Posts

Thursday, July 09, 2020

www.cfn-nce.ca/frailty-m
atters/avoid-frailty/


A full 81% of Canadians who've died so far from COVID-19 were residents of long term care homes.

No question: we need to improve our standards of care in these residences. Better infection control, full time hours, PPE and wages for front line workers. And here's hoping that happens.

But in general it's also striking that LTC residents now tend to be much more frail than they were in previous generations. Regardless of age, people do stay at home (with community care support) until they require much more support with activities of daily living, whether because of physical or mental disabilities or both.

So: supposing we want to give ourselves the best possible chance of remaining strong and vital well into our ninth decades or longer: is there anything we can do to AVOID developing frailty?

Yes!

We can:

A Stay ACTIVE

V Ensure all VACCINATIONS are up to date: for flu, for pneumonia, for shingles . .

O: OPTIMIZE medications with an (at least) annual medication review

I: INTERACT, stay IN TOUCH -- with family, friends: because social connection is vital

D: Be attentive to our DIET, for optimum nutrition and weight.


All right then . .. more of the same, and what most Sparkies are already doing. What we already knew, innately: because that's what feels good anyhow. But yeah: further motivation to keep on keeping on doing just that.

So we can do our individual part to AVOID frailty as long as possible and if it's possible to do so!!

.

Share This Post With Others
Member Comments About This Blog Post
  • _CYNDY55_
    emoticon emoticon
    27 days ago
  • JAMER123
    emoticon emoticon
    27 days ago
  • 79PODGIRL
    Well Said!
    27 days ago
  • no profile photo GRAMPIAN
    emoticon
    27 days ago
  • NASFKAB
    I know about AVOID am 78 & need a hernia operation but my cousin who would told me if he does it he will put me on the ventilator so am living with it. Thank you so much for this post
    27 days ago
  • MANGO1960
    emoticon emoticon
    27 days ago
  • no profile photo INCH_BY_INCH
    emoticon emoticon
    27 days ago
  • PLCHAPPELL
    doing all 8f those
    27 days ago
  • KITTYHAWK1949
    emoticon emoticon emoticon
    28 days ago
  • NANCY-
    Here that and think that you are doing well in the avoidance department.
    emoticon
    28 days ago
  • MARTHA324
    emoticon

    Think that motto should be front and center for all of us!
    emoticon
    28 days ago
  • DOVESEYES
    emoticon emoticon
    29 days ago
  • MTN_KITTEN
    You are only as old as you feel ... or didn't take care of yourself.

    My grandmother lived till 97 1/2 ... ran away from the nursing home coz she didn't want to be there or told what to do. She only lived there for 6 months ... and I swear that's the reason she passed away. She wanted her freedom, she wanted her life.

    She had always been strong. And the nursing home took that away.
    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • BKNOCK
    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • BJAEGER307
    emoticon emoticon
    29 days ago
  • TERMITEMOM
    Excellent points. Another reason to stay active.
    29 days ago
  • ALICIA363
    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • SPARKLINGME176
    I just wrote a long response to this blog, computer stooped! Time to get off of it!
    29 days ago
  • SUSAN_CDN
    Good advice!

    My Mom lived to 94 and her brother (my uncle who I was Personal Care Power of Attorney for) lived to 98, neither one of them went into LTC. Both followed your advice.
    29 days ago
  • QUARTERMASTER3
    emoticon emoticon
    29 days ago
  • 1CRAZYDOG
    Sharing this w/my DH. All this information is so inportant to stay vital. All the pieces fit together.

    Thanks!
    29 days ago
  • JHADZHIA
    Lots of people are living into their 90's these days and not necessarily frail in a nursing home. The ones living the longest seem to have had the harshest upbringing. Amazing how many vets who survived the war live to a ripe old age. The ones brought up with a strong work ethic, used to doing heavy chores. It builds a great foundation. My Mom did heavy work all her life, working under harsh conditions and as a result was blessed with a bone structure at the age of a 30 year old. She has always been active, working hard digging in her garden, doing the grass edging, so much of that all the time. She has no intention of ever going into a nursing home in spite of worn out knees and swollen hands. I can't do the heavy upper body work she can but I can put the mileage on my feet well enough. Mom and I don't drive so depend on our feet to get us there or a bus.
    Conditions are terrible in the LTC homes as I hear my sister-in-law complain frequently and has been
    our own experience with my poor grandmother. Its no wonder my Mom would rather die than go in one. They do need to do something. Its not the staff that is the issue -but the lack of staff and extreme cutbacks.
    29 days ago
  • PHOENIX1949
    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • NANASUEH
    Good advice for anytime but especially now.

    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • OHMEMEME
    Kuddos for all your blogs!
    My Mom turns 90 in a few days! Does not seem real that she is that old and literally has out-lived soooo many. She had a rough upbringing but blessed all of her adult life. Her body and mind are declining recently, but she still lives at home with assistance. She was always health aware and active. She still goes for out for “planned” fitness walking the drive with a walker or slowly pedaling away on her recumbent bike.
    I hope those good genes are in me!

    Keep Sparking Ellen!
    29 days ago
  • PHEBESS
    Absolutely and resoundingly YES!!!

    And along with Active and Interactive, keep that brain busy doing new and different things - just one more muscle to exercise!!!
    29 days ago
  • MOLLIEMAC
    Absolutely! My neighbour in my old neighbourhood just celebrated her 93rd birthday, she spends hours in her massive garden most days, makes sure she gets regular health checks and massages and grows all her own fruit and veggies. She is a proud Newfoundlander and knows much about a hard life and how to look after oneself.
    29 days ago
  • PATRICIA-CR
    emoticon emoticon emoticon
    29 days ago
  • OVERWORKEDJANET
    Nice!
    29 days ago
  • SUSIEMT
    I'm with you there! AVOID! emoticon
    29 days ago
  • DSHONEYC
    Have heard a couple of doctors presentations on frailty that really make sense. One cited his father, an active & vibrant 75 year old who developed a heart condition that a surgeon wanted to operate on to 'cure'...instead of treat. (Remember surgeons cut is the standard course of treatment) He came out of the surgery fine, a 'cure' but the post operative care and recovery left him frail and unable to care for himself. He died within a year.

    So frailty is the 'disease' and wellness treatments are the cure! AVOID is great advice. I would take it a step further ... stay away from surgery!
    29 days ago
  • LYNCHD05
    Yes that is my plan too. With all we are hearing about LTC I don’t think any of us want to be there.

    29 days ago
  • HARROWJET
    Good advice.
    29 days ago
  • PENOWOK
    I haven't worked in long term care for about 10 years, and did so for over 20 years (full to part-time), and I can agree...we saw the shift from "typical" residents to what was previously seen in hospitals. The hospitals took only the extremely acute, and nursing homes took those who were out of that 3-day window and needed slightly less care, but still daily with high levels of nursing. It was interesting watching the shift and all about the money. Many time, the teams I was a member of would state the patient should have stayed at least a few more days. Things change, as do we. and we must be physically ready to stay at home well into the 90's as did my father and my in-laws!
    29 days ago
  • MEADSBAY
    My retirement job for 6-7 years, after my mom died but before the grandkids came, was in-home private elder care. I always told the families ‘I’m a teacher, not a nurse’ so I got out of most personal care and mostly did companionship, meals and stimulation of one kind or another.
    I loved my old folks.
    Almost without exception, the elders who lived the longest (one to 98, one a month short of 100) were the ones who had been physically active all their lives, either recreationally or in their career.
    One was a professor who hiked the Appalachian Trail many many times.
    One was a maintenance man in our town hall for over 60 years.
    One was a PE teacher and football coach.
    They also had loving, involved families and continued to be curious about the world.
    Most enjoyed a nightly cocktail or glass of wine or two.
    I learned soooo much for them!
    emoticon
    29 days ago
  • BESSHAILE
    Even though I have done a lot of healthy things, made good choices and good changes, all to make today better, always in the back of my mind is that these actions will ALSO make tomorrow better.

    DH's type 2 diabetes - we work our butts off on that - knowing the disease could still progress - but by golly - we're not cultivating a garden it could grow in.

    good thing to remember and yes yes yes - Spark gets some kudos for helping us to keep at it.
    29 days ago
  • ONEKIDSMOM
    Amen. Good advice in any times, but now in particular! emoticon
    29 days ago
  • Add Your Comment to the Blog Post

    Log in to post a comment


    Disclaimer: Weight loss results will vary from person to person. No individual result should be seen as a typical result of following the SparkPeople program.