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1/8/19 11:44 P

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January 2019

As you loosen your belt and renew your vows to cut back on second helpings, dispense with desserts, and sign up at the gym, you will be relieved to know that we aren’t going to talk about going on diets or signing up for gym packages. We are going to talk about something everyone does, but very few talk about. Relief. Whatever you call it – gas, farting, flatus, or breaking wind – you are not alone. We all pass gas. It’s a side effect of digestion and a very (sometimes embarrassingly) natural part of life.

In this issue:

WHY WE FART
As your body digests food in the small intestine, components that can’t be broken down end up in the large intestine where the good gut bacteria get to work fermenting them. This produces gases that are either reabsorbed through the gut wall into the circulation and eventually exhaled through the lungs or excreted via the rectum as a fart. How much gas is normal? Where do the gases come from? What happens when you hold on (and is it harmful)? Prof Clare Collins explains.

FOODS THAT MAY CAUSE GAS
There’s no getting around it, the foods that ensure good gut health contain the sugars, sugar alcohols, starches and dietary fibres that give us gas. Check out this (slightly edited) summary from the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal for the lowdown.

BRING ON THE BEANS
A 3-month randomised controlled trial by Dr David Jenkins and colleagues found consuming about 1 cup (190g or 7oz) of cooked legumes (beans, chickpeas or lentils) helped people with diabetes manage their blood glucose and reduce their heart disease risk through a reduction in blood pressure. What about wind? The study didn’t find any more gastrointestinal complaints in the legume group.

THE FIBRE–FODMAP CONTROVERSY
Dietary fibres are important for optimising gut health and function and most of us are encouraged to eat more of them. However, avoiding FODMAPs (nondigestible, rapidly fermentable carbohydrates) is being recommended for people suffering from irritable bowel syndrome to help alleviate abdominal distress due to intestinal gas production and fluid shifts that lead to bloating. Prof Fred Brouns and colleagues summarise what we know and what is new/needs attention in the fibre–FODMAP controversy.

PERSPECTIVES
FABULOUS FIBRES
For our long-term health and wellbeing it’s important to consume a variety of fibres from a wide range of wholegrains, legumes, fruits and vegetables. Many of their health benefits occur they pass through to our large intestine and are digested by the trillions of microorganisms that form our microbiome, converting the indigestible carbohydrates into important fuels (e.g., fatty acids like butyrate), gases (e.g., hydrogen), and providing the bulk so important for laxation. What exactly are dietary fibres? What are the different types and where do you find them? Dr Alan Barclay explains.

KEEPING IT GREEN
A GREENER NEW YEAR IN THE KITCHEN
Looking after our planet is a gift that keeps on giving throughout the year and beyond. As New Year is a good time for fresh starts and resolutions, how about adopting environmentally friendly habits for 2019? Nicole Senior and Rachel Ananin have some suggestions from buying sustainable food and reducing food waste, to being a better recycler and avoiding single-use disposable plastics.

GOOD CARBS FOOD FACTS A TO Z
RED KIDNEY BEANS
Ideal for soups, stews, curries and salads, red kidney beans give great texture and colour to salsas and dips, are a frugal filling for wraps, give starchy satisfaction to salads, and are expert extenders of one-pot meat meals such as chilli beef. They are high in fibre – including soluble fibre that helps lower bad LDL cholesterol and modulate blood glucose response – and a good source of protein and folate. To top it all off, they have a low GI. Check out our handy tips for cooking from scratch to reduce their windy side-effects.

GI NEWS KITCHEN
LOW GI NUTRITION POWER-PACKS
Three recipes this month: Anneka Manning’s Tacos from The Low GI Family Cookbook (Hachette); Alan Barclay’s Tarragon Chicken and Beans from Reversing Diabetes (Murdoch Books); and Yotam Ottolenghi’s and Sami Tamimi’s Roasted Chicken with Jerusalem Artichokes and Lemon from Jerusalem (Random House).
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Go to:
ginews.blogspot.com/#A-Z



Val

Moving More! Eating Less!
Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

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