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October 2019

These days, processed food seems to be associated with either “junk food” or food additives – things that many people would rather avoid if they could. In Food for Thought, Prof Jennie Brand-Miller reminds us that food processing is nothing new, that it has delivered a number of benefits, and that perhaps we should see it as an example of human creativity at its best. One example of such creativity is how the Indigenous people in far northeast Queensland (Australia) discovered thousands of years ago that they could make the inedible edible by leaching the toxins from rainforest tree nuts, a dietary staple.

In this issue:

FOOD FOR THOUGHT
FIVE THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT FOOD PROCESSING
First, it’s nothing new says Prof Jennie Brand-Miller reminding us that our paleolithic ancestors were stone grinding seeds, drying fruits and leaching toxins from plant foods long before the agricultural revolution some 12,000 years ago. Since then we have discovered numerous ways to process fresh food to extend its shelf life, to kill the bacteria that will contaminate it, to avoid wasting excess food from the harvest, and to expand our dietary choices.

WHAT’S NEW?
PLANT PROTEIN LINKED TO LONGER LIFE
Greater consumption of plant-based proteins such as those found in cereals and legumes is associated with lower mortality risk according to an observational study of 70,000 Japanese adults aged 40 to 69. In JAMA Internal Medicine, the researchers report swapping out 3% of energy from animal protein with plant protein resulted in lower risk for total, cardiovascular, and cancer-related mortality. Risk reductions were even greater when substituting plants for processed meats. “Encouraging diets with higher plant-based protein intake may contribute to long-term health and longevity,” they conclude.Read More.

PRODUCT REVIEW
FIVE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT EDIBLE SEAWEEDS
Two recent books, Ocean Greens by Lisette Kreischer and Marcel Schuttelaar (The Experiment Publishing) and Bren Smith’s Eat Like a Fish (Murdoch Books), inspired us to take a closer look at the edible seaweeds we use as ingredients and flavourings in sauces, soups, salads, stews and side dishes and as sources of food additives such as carrageen and agar agar. In Product Review we look at what they are, what’s in them, how you prepare them, and how much you should eat. We have also put together a simple guide to What Seaweed Is That.

PERSPECTIVES: DR ALAN BARCLAY
FOOD SAFETY: A VITAL INGREDIENT FOR LONGEVITY
Did you know that foodborne illness is a significant cause of acute illness and even death in developed nations like Australia (an estimated 5.4 million cases of food poisoning each year); Canada (estimated 4 million cases each year); and the USA (estimated 48 million cases each year)? While we tend to focus on the importance of eating healthy foods, meals and diets for long-term health and longevity, Dr Alan Barclay reminds us that food safety is an extremely important issue that is often overlooked and is not going away – it appears to be increasing worldwide.

GOOD CARBS FOOD FACTS
WILD RICE
A distant cousin of regular rice, wild rice (GI 57) is a cool climate water grass that traditionally grew in shallow lakes and marshes in the Great Lakes area and upper Minnesota (it’s Minnesota’s official State Grain). For at least 2500 years, Native Americans harvested its seeds in canoes powered by long poles, using beater sticks to knock the ripe seeds into the bottom of their canoes. It has a firm, chewy texture and nutty flavour and it is a good source of fibre and key vitamins and minerals. You can also pop it like popcorn. Check out the Good Carb Food Facts.

THE GOOD CARBS KITCHEN
VEGETARIAN RECIPES MAKE THE MOST OF WILD RICE AND EDIBLE SEAWEED
Time to get cooking with good carbs. Try Kate McGhie’s Wild and Brown Rice Pilaf with Mushrooms and Almonds from The Good Carbs Cookbook (Murdoch Books), and Autumnal Wild Rice Salad with Hijiki, a vegan recipe from Ocean Greens by Lisette Kreischer and Marcel Schuttelaar (The Experiment Publishing).

Go to:
ginews.blogspot.com/#A-Z



Val

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Motivation gets you started, habit keeps you going!

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